Discovering new orchids

André Schuiteman, research leader in Identification & Naming at Kew, describes how new orchid species are discovered and how we could speed up the process of discovery.

Why and how are we saving seeds of Pacific island plants?

Kew has been developing an ambitious seed conservation programme in the Pacific region. Why should we direct our efforts to conserve native species of this region? Peter Giovannini explores some valuable reasons for investing resources in the conservation of Pacific floras and describes conservation activities to collect and store the seeds of the plant species of the Pacific region.

Frankincense: resin with many stories

At a time of year when frankincense, myrrh and gold come to mind, Mark Nesbitt hunts for the scent of the Orient in Kew’s Economic Botany Collection.

Floras: In it for the long haul...

As Kew launches the world's first tropical regional Flora in ebook format, botanist Martin Cheek reflects on the hugely important and practically relevant information held within Floras and the future of Floras online.

A seed conservation network for islands of the Mediterranean Basin

An ambitious conservation project based in the Mediterranean Basin has come to the end of its first three-year phase. Sarah Hanson, from Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank, describes how seven conservation organisations have come together to protect the flora of this fragile region.

Crop wild relatives - creating guides for seed collectors

There is a pressing need for agriculture to adapt to climate change, and learning more about wild relatives of crop plants could help us achieve this. Laura Jennings describes how collecting guides produced by Kew help make seed-collecting fieldwork as productive as possible.

Africa's Great Green Wall - towards a sustainable future

To highlight UNESCO’s World Science Day for Peace and Development on November 10th, Serene Hargreaves from the Millennium Seed Bank describes how Kew is working with communities in sub-Saharan Africa to build a ‘Green Wall’ that will contribute to their sustainable future.

Abrus precatorius - a deadly beauty

Gerhard Prenner, researcher in plant morphology and anatomy, presents his recent studies on Abrus precatorius, a "deadly beauty" with fascinating flowers and inflorescences.

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