Kew's iconic plants

From ancient trees and the world's oldest pot plant to the famous - and foul-smelling - titan arum, Kew's flagship plants flourish under the care of its horticulturists. Come and visit them today...

Caucasian elm leaves

Caucasian elm

The Caucasian elm is tolerant of Dutch elm disease, which killed over 25 million of our native English elms by the 1990s.


1 comment

Acorns of the chestnut-leaved oak

Chestnut-leaved oak

This is Kew's biggest tree! The Tree Register of Britain and Ireland recognises it as an unrivalled champion – meaning you won't see a finer specimen anywhere in the country.


0 comments

Chinese plum yew

Chinese plum yew

Kew's Chinese plum yew looks more like a small bush than a tree, but in its native China this species can grow up to 20 m tall.


0 comments

Corsican pine

Corsican pine

Kew botanist R. A. Salisbury brought this conifer to Kew as a six-inch seedling from the South of France in 1814.


0 comments

Eastern Cape giant cycad (Encephalartos altensteinii) in the Palm House

Eastern Cape giant cycad

Housed in a large wooden box at the southern end of the Palm House, the Eastern Cape giant cycad could be the oldest pot plant in the world.


0 comments

False Acacia

False acacia or black locust tree

This tree is one of Kew’s five remaining 'Old Lions' – trees planted in 1762 as part of the original Gardens. Now it has to be supported by metal bands and was almost seen off by a lightning strike in 2009. Enjoy it while you still can.


1 comment

Giant Waterlily

Giant waterlilies

These huge aquatic plants are native to tropical South America.


8 comments

Indian horse chestnut (Aesculus indica)

Indian horse chestnut

Deer and squirrels eat Indian horse chestnut seeds, but they can be poisonous to humans. The small conkers contain a substance called aesculin, which destroys red blood cells.


8 comments

Jade Vine

Jade vine

The jade vine (Strongylodon macrobotrys) is a member of the pea and bean family, and is best known for its hanging stems of jade-green flowers.


14 comments

Lucombe oak leaves

Lucombe oak

This hybrid oak was originally planted 20 m north of its current location, but in 1846 – when it was already a large, 73 year old tree – it was moved to make way for the creation of Syon Vista, one of the avenues radiating out from the Palm House.


0 comments

Page  1  | 2 of 2  
Displaying 1 to 10 of 20 matches
See your favourite reasons to visit