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Heritage trees at Kew Gardens

Sponsoring an individual tree is a unique way to celebrate the life of someone special, mark the birth of a child or remember a special anniversary or event.

Quercus palustris

Choose an individual tree at Kew Gardens to remember someone special or to celebrate a special event.

Sponsoring an individual tree is a unique way to remember a special anniversary, celebrate a family event or commemorate the life of a loved one.

Our range of trees start at £5,000, with some newly planted trees on the historic Pagoda Vista at £10,000.

Trees in Kew Gardens do not have commemorative plaques but all gifts along with your personal dedication, are recorded on the touchscreen register. Commemorative Trees are also recorded on Kew's Arboretum database, which holds the curatorial information and unique accession number of every tree grown in the Gardens.


Heritage trees at Kew Gardens

All of our commemorative trees have been selected to include a variety of beautiful specimens set in prominent areas of the Gardens. There are over thirty trees available for individual sponsorship and we would be happy to show you the trees that are available at Kew Gardens, please contact us to arrange a meeting.

Sponsor a tree today


European or common hornbeam (Carpinus betulus)
Carpinus Betulus

One of Britain's native deciduous trees i.e. trees that shed their leaves seasonally, this tree can be found in oak and beech woodlands across the south of England. The immensely hard wood of the Carpinus betulus once made it popular in industry. While the leaves of the beech and the hornbeam are superficially similar, closer inspection reveals those of the beech to have smooth edges, while the hornbeam's are sharply serrated. The trunk tends to have a twisted fluted shape with deep splits as if it has been under enormous pressure. This apparent deformity is actually a sign of great strength. Trees reach an average height of 10-20m.

  • Location: Pagoda Vista
  • Accession Numbers: 2010-2413 and 2010-2414
  • These two Heritage Trees are available for £10,000 each

Sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa)

Castanea satvia

This is a deciduous tree i.e. one that sheds its leaves seasonally, widespread across Europe. In autumn it produces edible nuts that have been eaten for centuries. The wood of the tree is durable and is used to make furniture, barrels, fencing and roof beams. Originally native to south-eastern Europe and Asia Minor, a fully-grown tree is typically an impressive 20-35 metres in height with a trunk about two metres in diameter. Catkins hold the flowers of both sexes, with the males in the upper part and female flowers in the lower. These 10-20 cm long catkins appear in late June to July, and by autumn the female flowers develop into spiny protective cases called cupules. This prickly outer layer is designed to deter squirrels and other seed predators from getting to the brown nuts within, and are shed in October.

  • Location: By the Rhizotron and Treetop Walkway
  • Accession Number: 2010-2412
  • This Heritage Tree is available for £10,000

Small-leaved lime (Tilia cordata)

Tilia cordata

A pair of small-leaved limes located on the historic Pagoda Vista. The small-leaved lime is found relatively rarely in Britain today, but from peat-preserved pollen grains we know it to be one of our oldest native trees. The wood of the lime tree is soft and even-grained which makes it ideal for carving and, as it does not warp, it is perfect for musical instruments. As a result, it is still used for piano and organ keys. Sweet-smelling clusters of yellow flowers appear in July attracting bees. Small, smooth fruits are also produced and their lack of hairs and ribbing make them easy to distinguish from other limes.

  • Location: Pagoda Vista
  • Accession Numbers: 2010-2415 and 2010-2416
  • These two Heritage Trees are available for £10,000 each

 

 


Broad maple (Acer longipes subsp. amplum)

The crown of this tree is broad and spreading on a short trunk. Leaves turn to yellow in the Autumn. In the wild this tree would grow in mixed forests, but is cultivated as an ornamental. Deciduous tree i.e. one that sheds its leaves seasonally, reaching an average height of 10-15m.
 
  • Location: Pathway towards the Minka House.
  • Accession Number: 2005-672
  • Available for £5,000

 

 

 


Tulip tree (Liriodendron chinense)

A native to southern and central China, this is far rarer than its American cousin (L. tulipferum) due to it being a less hardy species and more picky about its habitat. Having been felled on a grand scale in the wild and only introduced to Britain in 1901, the planting of 28 young trees in Kew Gardens in 2001 was an important step towards preserving this primitive species. This beautiful specimen can be found in 'Tulip Tree Avenue'.
 
  • Location: Near the Azalea Garden - Grid reference I4 on Visitor Map
  • Accession Number: 2001-1171
  • Available for £5,000

 


Himalayan oak (Quercus pseudosemicarpifolia)

This tree has bold, evergreen foliage (i.e. it has leaves all year round) with spreading level branches that come down to ground level. It is an attractive tree, particularly in the early summer when carrying the male, golden yellow, pendent catkins. It is generally cultivated as an ornamental, but in the wild it would occur in dry woods from the northwest Himalayas across to Sichuan and northwest Yunnan.
 
  • Location: Next to Rhododendron Dell
  • Accession Number: 2004-1223
  • Available for £5,000

 

 


Korean euodia (Tetradium daniellii)

The earthy scent, naked buds and opposite pinnate leaves with small round oil glands distinguish this tree. It flowers in the late summer or early autumn - but before the autumn colour develops, and the flowers are followed by purplish fruits. This is a deciduous tree i.e. one that sheds its leaves seasonally, and  will reach a height of between 10-20m.
 
  • Location: Pathway at the southern end of the Princess of Wales Conservatory.
  • Accession Number: 1989-8291
  • Available for £5,000

 


Platycarya (Platycarya strobilacea)

Rarely seen in Britain, this is a small deciduous tree (i.e. one that sheds its leaves seasonally) that is native to eastern Asia. It has distinctive brown cone-like fruits and also produces a dye from both its cones and its bark. Platycarya strobilacea is the only species in the genus Platycarya and is a member of the Juglandaceae or walnut family. Although it does produce distinctive fruits, they are not edible and are more like cones than the nuts associated with other members of the walnut family. Can grow to about 12m but is often smaller and more of a large shrub.
 
  • Location: Pathway at the southern end of the Princess of Wales Conservatory.
  • Accession Number: 1989-3729
  • Available for £5,000

 


White ash (Fraxinus americana)

Upright and rather slender in its youth but matures to make a broad headed tree, which, with age develops broad outstretched boughs. Trees reach a height of 40m and may have a spread of 15m; may live to up to 300 years old. The leaves are opposite, feather compound, with leaflets occurring in groups of 5-9. In autumn, the foliage turns yellowish with an overlay of burgundy or purple. The bark is grey to brown with furrows and ridges, making a diamond pattern on the surface of the bark.
 
  • Location: Princess Walk opposite the Cedar of Lebanon
  • Accession Numbers:
    • 2005-716, 2005-717, 2005-718, 2005-719, 2005-720
    • 2005-721, 2005-723 and 2005-724
  • This group of beautiful specimens are available for £5,000 each

 


 

Amur lime (Tilia amurensis)

Tilia amurensis is widespread in far-eastern Asia ranging from Siberian Manchuria to Korea, but is rarely cultivated in Britain. This deciduous tree (i.e. one that sheds its leaves seasonally) can reach heights of 25m. The leaves are bright green in the summer turning a vibrant shade of orange throughout autumn, whilst the attractive yellow flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by insects.
 
  • Location: Between the Temple of Bellona and the Pagoda Vista
  • Accession Number: 1925-41603
  • Available for £5,000

 

 


Lime (Tilia sp.)

Tilia is a genus of about 30 species of trees native throughout most of the temperate Northern Hemisphere, in Asia (where the greatest species diversity is found), Europe and eastern North America; they are not native to western North America.They are generally called lime in Britain and linden or basswood in North America. Tilia are large deciduous trees, typically reaching 20 to 40 metres tall, with oblique-cordate leaves 6 to 20 centimetres across.
 

  • Location: Between the Temple of Bellona and the Pagoda Vista
  • Accession Number: 1978-4930
  • Available for £5,000.00

 

 


Lime (Tilia miqueliana)

Tilia miqueliana is native to eastern China. It is a deciduous tree (i.e. one that sheds its leaves seasonally) and will reach heights of approximately 15m. The leaves are glossy and bright green above but the under surface is covered in a dull grey felt. This tree is sacred to Buddhists, and has long been cultivated surrounding temples in both China and Japan.
 
  • Location: Between the Temple of Bellona and the Pagoda Vista
  • Accession Number: 1998-212
  • Available for £5,000 each

 

 


Yunnan crabapple (Malus yunnanensis)

Malus yunnanensis is a deciduous tree (i.e. one that sheds its leaves seasonally) and can reach heights of up to 10m with a diameter of 6m. It comes into flower in May, the flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by insects. The seeds ripen from September to October. This tree is noted for attracting wildlife.
 
  • Location: On Holly Walk between the Temperate House and Japanese gateway - Grid Reference D7 on the Visitor Map
  • Accession Number: 1999-4268
  • Available for £5,000

 

 


Stone pine (Pinus pinea)

Of the dozen or so species of pine now resident in Britain, Pinus pinea is one of the most easily recognisable. Also known as the umbrella pine, it has a tall, slim trunk, relative to its height, with a spray of branches at the top, which radiate outwards just like an umbrella. The lifespan of pines varies depending on its environment but they have been known to live as long as 300 years. The pine nuts from Pinus pinea have been eaten for thousands of years, but in Britain it is generally not warm enough for the trees to produce ripe pine nuts and is planted only as an ornamental tree.
 
  • Location: The Mediterranean Garden.
  • Accession Numbers: 2007-74, 2007-78, 2007-79
  • Available for £5,000 each

 


Pin oak (Quercus palustris)

This tree has glossy leaves and characteristic tufts of pale brown coloured hairs in the vein axils beneath. A deciduous tree i.e. one that sheds its leaves seasonally, reaching 20-25m in height. In the wild this tree grows in marshy places, which is the translation of the Latin name Quercus palustris.
 

  • Location: By the Rhizotron and Treetop Walkway
  • Accession Numbers: 2008-3086, 2008-3087, 2008-3088 and 2008-3089
  • Available for £5,000 each