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Sponsored species

We'd like to thank the following supporters who have already sponsored these plant species at Kew's Millennium Seed Bank.

 
Acanthus syriacus

Acanthus syriacus

A rare and endangered thorny desert plant from Lebanon

Sponsored for £1,000 in memory of Peggy Yorke Allen by Charlotte, Harriet and John Allen

 

 
Actinidia kolomikta

Actinidia kolomikta

A deciduous, climbing shrub, with slender, twining branches and heart-shaped green leaves that are splashed with pink and white.

Saved in memory of Nora & Barry Chivers.

 

 
Adansonia digitata

Adansonia digitata

 A defining icon of African bushland.

The Kenyan collection of seeds of the Baobab have been sponsored by the family and friends of Paul Anthony Keane. In memory of a wonderful man who could always find the extraordinary in the ordinary and the beauty in the every day. 

 

 
Aerangis spiculata

Aerangis spiculata

Found growing in the humid, lowland, evergreen forests in the north of Madagascar, these are usually epiphytes in the form of an inflorescence pendant between 30-75cm. 

Sponsored in memory of “GrandKen” Ken Adams with love from Mark, Marian and Claire. "Orchids were one of his favourite flowers."

 

 
Alluaudia procera

Alluaudia procera

Madagascan ocotillo is a succulent that grows up to 18 m in height, with a mass of small yellow flowers. Found in the south western dry spiny forest-thicket of Madagascar, which have been reduced by almost 30% since the 1970s.

Sponsored at £2,000, with thanks to Martin Heywood.

 

 
Angraecum eburneum

Angraecum eburneum

Found growing on trees and rocks of dry tropical forests of Madagascar, many species of of Angraecum are considered to be at risk from extinction in the wild.

Sponsored by The Volunteer Guides at Kew to commemorate 20 years of guiding at Kew

 

 
Angraecum protensum

Angraecum protensum

 
Found growing on quartz outcrops at between 1600–2000m, this is an erect, lithophyte growing up to 35cm tall. It has linear, greyish-brown leaves and large white flowers which appear between January and March.

Sponsored by Emma and John Carter to celebrate their 4th Wedding Anniversary. 19th June 2013.

 

 
Banksia solandri

Banksia solandri

As well as being attractive plants, they provide food and shelter for pygmy possums and other native animals.

Sponsored at £2,000, with thanks to Ian Ridpath.

 

 
Bulbine crassa

Bulbine crassa

A species new to science, which through seed banking activity has its future guaranteed.

Sponsored to celebrate the 40th wedding anniversary of Martin and Rosie Godfrey.

 

 
Crepis foetida

Crepis foetida 

Known as the stinking hawk's-beard, this rare UK native plant is found in south-east coastal sites.

Sponsored  by the Uckfield Community Technology College.

 
Cypripedium calceolus

Cypripedium calceolus

Although  widely distributed in Europe and temperate Asia, the lady's slipper orchid was at the brink of extinction in Britain, with only one known specimen left. 

Sponsored at £2,000, with thanks to Chris and Lucy Taylor.

 
Dalea azurea

Dalea azurea

Propagated plants of this endangered Chilean plant species are ready to be reintroduced to the wild. This beautiful species is endemic, known only to be found in Chile.

Sponsored at £2,000, with thanks to Mrs Dale from Brighton.

 
Damasonium alisma

Damasonium alisma

A UK native plant species threatened by habitat decline.

Sponsored at £2,000, in celebration of a golden wedding anniversary.

 

 
Erica greyi

Erica greyi

A South African heather species, this plant was rediscovered a century after it was last collected.

Sponsored at £1,000, as a gift for Mr Alan and Mr Ted Grey.

 
Filipendula vulgaris

Filipendula vulgaris

A wild meadow species from the UK, the Dropwort (Filipendula vulgaris) has fine fern-like leaves and pretty white flowers.

Sponsored in celebration of the second birthday of a beloved Grandchild, Rhoda Naomi

 
Galanthus woronowii

Galanthus woronowii

A snowdrop native to Turkey, Russia and Georgia, Galanthus woronowii was named in honour of the Russian botanist and plant collector Georg Woronow (1874–1931).

Sponsored in memory of Nora & Barry Chivers

 

 
Gladiolus aureus

Gladiolus aureus

A once widespread plant species, this beautiful geophyte is on the verge of extinction in the wild. Gladiolus aureus is endemic, known only to be found in the Cape Peninsula of South Africa.

Sponsored at £1,000 in memory of Ruth Button.

 

 
Lotononis macroloba

Lotononis macroloba

A new species in the pea family, discovered in Namibia.

Sponsored as a Christmas present for Dr. M. Anne Reid.

 

 
Moringa hildebrandtii

Moringa hildebrandtii

A multi-purpose species known only to be found in Madagascar.

Sponsored at £2,000, with thanks to Mr Morries from Lancashire.

 

 
Origanum syriacum

Origanum syriacum

The most economically important edible wild plant in Lebanon.

Sponsored in memory of Kay Leadbeter.

 

 

 
Paralophia epiphytica

Paralophia epiphytica 

The Paralophia is a genus endemic to Madagascar and consist of only two species (the other being P. palmicola). As the name suggests, Paralophia epiphytica is an epiphyte, found on trees, climbing amongst leaf bases on the trunks of palm trees.

Sponsored at £1,000, with thanks to Valerie Livesey.

 

 
Phyteuma orbiculare

Phyteuma orbiculare

A deep blue, almost purple wildflower that is not as it seems: each head, rather than being a single bloom, is actually a collection of smaller ones, huddled together.  This is the “County flower of Sussex” and is also known as the Pride of Sussex.

Sponsored in memory of Jacqueline Nichols (nee Crick) by her family & friends

 

 
Plectranthus unguentariu

Plectranthus unguentarius

A highly threatened Namibian plant from the mint family, down to only 120 known plants in the wild.

Sponsored at £1,000 by the 2010 Year 6 classes of Holly Trees Primary School, Brentwood, Essex. 

 
Protea odorata

Protea odorata

A South African shrub down to just 17 individuals in the wild.

Sponsored by Nicole Smith on behalf of herself, Meryl Smith, Cecilia Frances Eugene Croft and Petronella Cornelia (Naude) Havemann.

 

 
Prunus avium

Prunus avium

Growing to 12 m (40 ft), the hard, reddish-brown hardwood of the wild cherry is much valued for woodturning, making cabinets, veneers and musical instruments.

Sponsored by Elizabeth, Alexandra and Victoria Duthie in memory of their father Sandy, brother Simon and grandparents Jack and Dandy Duthie.

"It's funny how those once so close and now gone, can still so affect our lives."

 
Prunus spinosa

Prunus spinosa

The fruits of the Blackthorn are astringent when fresh and are therefore not eaten in the same way as those of many other Prunus species. Sloes are used to make the alcoholic beverage known as sloe gin.

Sponsored by Elizabeth, Alexandra and Victoria Duthie in memory of their grandparents John and Rotha Knox.
"He only does it to annoy, because he knows it teases!"

 

 
Pulsatilla vulgaris

Pulsatilla vulgaris

The Pasque flower is one of over 300 UK species that are threatened with extinction from the UK countryside due to ever-increasing threats from intensive agriculture, urbanisation, road building, pollution and climate change.

Sponsored by John and Harriet Allen.

 
Ranunculus ficaria

Ranunculus ficaria

The low growing Lesser celandine is from the buttercup family. It is also known as ‘spring messenger’ as the plant is often referred to in literature as a sign of spring and is a British native.

Sponsored on behalf of Lucien Fa by his Friends and colleagues at Yoplait UK Limited to celebrate his retirement after 10 illustrious years as CEO Yoplait Groupe

 
Ranunculus lingua

Ranunculus lingua

This lovely wildflower is widespread but localised in the UK and Ireland, particularly in the southern regions. The spread of this species has declined in recent years due to the loss of its habitat as a result of drainage of land to make way for more intensive agriculture.

Sponsored by the members of The Ballet Association on behalf of Dame Monica Mason to celebrate her retirement after 54 illustrious years in The Royal Ballet, ten years as Director and her Patronage of  The Ballet Association

 

 
Roridula dentata

Roridula dentata

Known as the flycatcher bush, this plant does not consume the insects it traps but rather provides food for the assassin bugs. It has even been known to catch small birds.

Sponsored at £1,000 with thanks to Kew's own Digital Media Team - raising the money through a cycle ride from Kew Gardens to the Millennium Seed Bank at Wakehurst, West Sussex.

 
Rhododendron arboreum

Rhododendron arboreum

This large, evergreen shrub is native to Bhutan, China, India, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Nepal where it is the national flower.

Sponsored as a gift for Mr Mark Pigott.

 
Salvia verbenaca

Salvia verbenaca

The pale blue-violet flowers of Salvia verbenaca, a British native, attracts many insects, and are also edible by humans. Known as wild clary or wild sage.

Sponsored by RBG, Kew Enterprises in memory of a dear friend and colleague Hideyuki Kobayashi.

 
Sobennikoffia humbertiana

Sobennikoffia humbertiana

The Sobennikoffia is a genus endemic to Madagascar and consists of only three species. S. humbertiana can be found growing in evergreen forests on plateau and dry, deciduous scrubland and is a lithophyte (a plant growing upon stones and rocks). The flowers are white with a green mark in the throat of the spur and have a prominent 3-lobed lip and upcurved spur.

Sponsored In loving memory of Jasmine Sookoo from her family, who miss her greatly. "She was as beautiful as an orchid"

 

 
Sorbus aucuparia

Sorbus aucuparia

From repelling witches to preventing scurvy, the rowan tree has a long and interesting history and mythology.

Sponsored by Alicia Crawford on behalf of Lacy and James Crawford and their children.

 

 
Trochetiopsis ebenus

Trochetiopsis ebenus

A critically endangered plant species with only two surviving wild specimens remaining, on the island of St Helena.

Sponsored 

 
Verbascum phlomoides

Verbascum phlomoides


The plant has small, bright orange-yellow flowers with white or yellowish-haired stamens, and is also known as Clasping-leaved mullein, Clasping mullein, and Woolly mullein. Orange mullein has been used by herbalists to treat catarrh and other ailments - claims have even been made that fresh pieces of this species will drive away rodents.

Sponsored in celebration of the first birthday of a beloved Grandchild, Rhoda Naomi 

 
Viola ambigua

Viola ambigua

A central European violet known from only four localities and threatened by urban development.

Sponsored as a gift for Mrs Joy Helen Ironside. 

 
Vriesea splendens

Vriesea splendens
 

From Guyana, the flaming sword plant (Vriesea splendens) is an epiphyte, growing on other plants rather than in soil, in tropical rainforests. The stripy leaves grow in a rosette shape and the bright red flower spike bears many small yellow flowers.

Sponsored as a gift for Rebecca Levy by Scott Aitken