Reactive Oxygen Species as Markers of Seed Quality

Reactive Oxygen Species are involved in many processes from seed maturation to dormancy, desiccation tolerance and germination

This project is part of the 'Diagnosis of Viability and Germination'.

Seeds, as all ‘aerobic’ organisms, depend on oxygen to respire. Oxygen, however, readily forms ‘reactive oxygen species’ (ROS). These are highly reactive compounds that have the potential to destroy key molecules such as DNA, proteins and lipids. Hence, ROS have been directly correlated with degenerative processes, illnesses and death. On the other hand, ROS play significant ‘positive roles’ including signalling and defence from pathogen attack. Funded by the Leverhume Trust, the main objective of this project is to enhance understanding of the role of ROS in seed physiology, and to apply the new fundamental knowledge obtained to improve the methods of ex situ conservation of seeds in seed banks.

Project Team

Project Leader: Kranner, Ilse

Seed Conservation Department

Ilse Kranner, Thomas Roach (PhD student), Hugh Pritchard, Louise Colville

Project Partners and Collaborators

Russia

Russian Academy of Sciences

South Africa

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

Funders

Russia

Russian Academy of Sciences (gift-in-kind)

South Africa

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal (gift-in-kind)

UK

Leverhulme Trust

MSBP