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Quercus castaneifolia (chestnut-leaved oak)

An extremely rare sight in Britain, the chestnut-leaved oak is native to the mountains of the Caucasus and Iran.
Trunk, branches and leaves of chestnut-leaved oak

Quercus castaneifolia at Kew

Species information

Common name: 

chestnut-leaved oak

Conservation status: 

Not threatened.

Habitat: 

Mountain slopes up to 2,000 metres, especially south-facing and on fertile sandy soil. At lower altitudes the trees form woodland; at higher altitude they appear as scattered specimens.

Key Uses: 

A forestry and ornamental species.

Known hazards: 

Not recorded

Taxonomy

Subclass: 
Superorder: 
Rosanae
Order: 
Fagales
Family: 
Fagaceae
Genus: Quercus

About this species

An extremely rare sight in Britain, the chestnut-leaved oak is native to the mountains of the Caucasus and Iran. The tree was introduced to Britain as seed in 1843 and it was from this first batch that Kew’s trees were grown. The oldest chestnut-leaved oak specimen at Kew was planted in 1846 and is now one of the finest known, standing a magnificent 30 metres tall. Individual specimens can live for 400-500 years, and sometimes as long as 1,000 years.

Genus: 
Quercus

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