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Guibourtia ehie (black hyedua)

A tall forest tree from west Central Africa, black hyedua is valued for its timber, which is used in general carpentry in Ghana as a substitute for rosewood (Dalbergia spp.)
Detail of a herbarium specimen of Guibourtia ehie

Detail of a herbarium specimen of Guibourtia ehie collected by A. Chevalier from the Ivory Coast in 1909.

Species information

Scientific name: 

Guibourtia ehie (A.Chev.) J.Léonard

Common name: 

black hyedua, ovangkol (English), amazoué (French), bubinga, hyedua-nini, amazakoné (Ghana)

Conservation status: 

Least Concern (LC) according to IUCN Red List criteria.

Habitat: 

Various forest types, from closed rainforest to drier semi-deciduous forest.

Key Uses: 

Necklaces (made from copal, the fossil resin produced by the tree, see Uses, below), lighting (copal is flammable), timber.

Known hazards: 

None known.

Taxonomy

Subclass: 
Superorder: 
Rosanae
Order: 
Fabales
Family: 
Leguminosae/Fabaceae - Caesalpinioideae
Genus: Guibourtia

About this species

Black hyedua is a West African timber tree, common in its natural habitat where it generally grows in small stands in a variety of forest types, from closed rainforest to drier semi-deciduous forest. The papery pods contain a single seed and are dispersed intact, mainly by wind. The thin pod walls soon rot away on the ground leaving the seed free to germinate.

Synonym: 

Copaifera ehie

Genus: 
Guibourtia

main info

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