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Camillea leprieurii

Camillea leprieurii is a fungus dependent on rainforest trees for survival but can only be easily detected when observed growing out of dead branches.
Camillea leprieurii fruiting structures growing from a dead trunk in Ecuador

Camillea leprieurii fruiting structures growing from a dead trunk in Ecuador (Photo: Jens H. Petersen/MycoKey.com)

Species information

Scientific name: 

Camillea leprieurii Mont.

Conservation status: 

Not assessed under IUCN criteria. Currently widespread but vulnerable to forest deforestation.

Habitat: 

On and in dead fallen logs and branches.

Key Uses: 

None known.

Known hazards: 

None known.

Taxonomy

Kingdom: 
Fungi
Phylum: 
Ascomycota
Subphylum: 
Pezizomycotina
Order: 
Xylariales
Family: 
Xylariaceae
Genus: Camillea

About this species

Camillea leprieurii is familiar to mycologists surveying rainforests in South America and is strange owing to its fruiting structures taking two forms. The charcoal-stick form is the most frequently noted, which has black pencil-like structures (as seen in the image above), but this fungus also grows immersed in dead wood with only its uppermost surface visible. Tiny spores (the fungal equivalent of seeds) are ejected from the ends of the fruiting structures.

Genus: 
Camillea

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