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Acacia torrei

Restricted to central Mozambique, Acacia torrei was known from only three herbarium specimens collected in the 1940s, until further collections were made by Kew botanists in 2006.
The golden-yellow inflorescences of Acacia torrei

The golden-yellow inflorescences of Acacia torrei (Image: Bart Wursten)

Species information

Scientific name: 

Acacia torrei Brenan

Conservation status: 

Data Deficient (DD) according to IUCN Red List Criteria.

Habitat: 

Alluvial soils under wet grassland or scrub, and savanna (grassy plains) on black clay soils.

Key Uses: 

None known.

Known hazards: 

The leaf bases have spines up to five cm long.

Taxonomy

Subclass: 
Superorder: 
Rosanae
Order: 
Fabales
Family: 
Leguminosae/Fabaceae - Mimosoideae
Genus: Acacia

About this species

Acacia torrei was formally described by the British botanist John Patrick Micklethwait Brenan (1917-1985) in Kew Bulletin in 1968 when he was Keeper of the Herbarium. Little is known about this African shrub, which belongs to the pea and bean family (Leguminosae). Until recently it was only represented by three herbarium specimens collected in the 1940s. One of these was found by the explorer Antonio Rocha da Torre (1904-1995), who collected in Angola and Mozambique. His type specimen is housed in the Lisbon Herbarium, Portugal, and A. torrei was named after him. Further collections were made by Kew botanists David Goyder and Jonathan Timberlake during an expedition to Mozambique in 2006.

Genus: 
Acacia

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