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The Times Eureka Garden, in association with the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Aerial impression of Times Eureka Garden design in association with Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

(Credit: Marcus Barnett Design + NEX)

Impression of Times Eureka Garden design in association with Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

(Credit: Marcus Barnett Design + NEX

Garden designer Marcus Barnett

 

 
Please note that the images below are representing the genus of plants that will feature, and are not images of the exact species that will feature in the Garden

(Credit: W. Stuppy)

Species in the genus Betula are cultivated not only as an ornamental but also for their timber and medicinal uses. Wine made from the sap was once taken as a medicine in Britain. One of the major constituents of the bark of Betula pendula (silver birch), betulinic acid, has shown activity against cancerous cells and HIV.

The species that will feature in the garden from this genus is Betula alba

(Credit: W. Stuppy)

Species in the genus Betula are cultivated not only as an ornamental but also for their timber and medicinal uses. Wine made from the sap was once taken as a medicine in Britain. One of the major constituents of the bark of Betula pendula (silver birch), betulinic acid, has shown activity against cancerous cells and HIV.

The species that will feature in the garden from this genus is Betula alba

(Credit: P.Gasson)

Species within this genus have a long history of medicinal use, for example the flowers of Papaver rhoeas (shown above)have been used in treating mild pain caused by earache, toothache and neuralgia, and an infusion of the petals is traditionally taken for coughs, insomnia and poor digestion.

The species that will feature in the garden from this genus is Papaver somniferum

(Credit: W. Stuppy)

Species within this genus have a long history of medicinal use, for example the flowers of Papaver rhoeas have been used in treating mild pain caused by earache, toothache and neuralgia, and an infusion of the petals is traditionally taken for coughs, insomnia and poor digestion.

The species that will feature in the garden from this genus is Papaver somniferum

 

 

(Credit: C.Clubbe)

Commonly know as a Cayman sage, this image of Salvia caymanensis represents the genus of Salvia - a large genus of about 900 species of often aromatic, flowering plants containing mainly herbs and numerous sub-shrubs.

Cultivars of the genus Salvia that will feature in the garden include Salvia ‘Caradonna’ and ‘Viola Klose’.

 

 

 

 

 

(Credit: W. Stuppy)

Rosemary (Rosmarius officinalis picutured above) is one of the most prized culinary herbs; its reputation for medicinal uses meant that it was planted in many old herbal gardens. Scientific research has shown that rosmarinic acid, one of the main constituents of rosemary, inhibits certain enzymes linked to neurological disorders causing memory loss. Scientists at Kew investigating the benefits of rosmarinic acid found it has strong anti-oxidant properties.

Cultivars of the species Rosmarius officinalis that will feature in the garden include Rosmarinus officinalis Prostratus Group/Tuscan Blu

   

The finished Garden

Achillea millefolium

Cantaurea montana (Alba)

Eryngium and Dianthus

Acanthus mollis (bear's breech)

 

 

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