We know that the public are worried about species disappearing, but who’s heard of Nagoya?

Working in partnership with Kew and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the Natural History Museum launches The Big Nature Debate to explore public concerns about biodiversity loss ahead of the Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity in Nagoya, Japan.

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13 Sep 2010

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Join The Big Nature Debate.

British people are worried about the drastic loss of native species, the effects of climate change on global wildlife and over-fishing, according to research commissioned by the Natural History Museum. Yet 85% of those asked did not know that next month officials from 193 countries are meeting in Japan to take important decisions about the future of biodiversity, which could affect how we protect, manage and make use of the planet’s diversity of life for decades to come.

The rapid loss of biodiversity and natural systems will affect the lives of everyone in coming decades. From our research we know that one in two people in Great Britain, for example, is really worried about the dramatic loss of nearly 500 species of plants, animals and fungi from England in the last 200 years.

Dr Robert Bloomfield, Director of the International Year of Biodiversity UK.

About The Big Nature Debate

In the International Year of Biodiversity 2010, the Natural History Museum is launching The Big Nature Debate to get the public talking about biodiversity and the world around them.

Working with International Year of Biodiversity partners, Kew and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the debate will be a platform for information, opinion and discussion about biodiversity issues ahead of the Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity (COP 2010) which is being held in Nagoya, Japan, in October 2010.

While governments recognise the importance of the problem, the outcomes from the conference will also rely on ordinary people to understand the issues and help build a more sustainable society. Without this there will be little chance of long-term success.

Biodiversity and us

Dr Robert Bloomfield, Director of the International Year of Biodiversity UK, said ‘The rapid loss of biodiversity and natural systems will affect the lives of everyone in coming decades. From our research we know that one in two people in Great Britain, for example, is really worried about the dramatic loss of nearly 500 species of plants, animals and fungi from England in the last 200 years. Two thirds (65%) of people asked would like to know more about issues such as over-fishing and the loss of biodiversity.

‘However, species loss is only one part of the problem. The human race relies on the biodiversity of the natural world to maintain the healthy environment in which we all live. Biodiversity loss threatens the health, wealth and well-being of the world’s population and will have consequences for generations to come. It is crucial that we understand the scale of the issues and as a global society respond to them while we still can.

'We want to get people talking about these issues and inspire them to make a difference. Very few people (12%) know there is an important meeting next month to take decisions about biodiversity. Only 13% of those surveyed could explain what biodiversity – the amazing variety of life on our planet – is, and how we benefit so much from it. With the Nagoya conference next month, The Big Nature Debate could not come at a more important time and we hope to capture the interest of as many people as possible.'

Join in the debate

Are you concerned about the loss of biodiversity? What do you think we should be doing to manage and preserve it? Join us in the debate and take this opportunity to discuss biodiversity in the run up to the global biodiversity conference in Nagoya, Japan, at the end of October.

The Big Nature Debate will be streamed live the Natural History Museum on 7 October 2010 - www.nhm.ac.uk/bignaturedebate.


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1 comment on 'We know that the public are worried about species disappearing, but who’s heard of Nagoya?'

Gwynneth Cox-Barber says

19/09/2010 6:42:15 PM | Report abuse

I love Kesw, used to walk there often in the early 1970's before moving to Somerset, now Devon. My granddaughter is now working in the Archive Dept for a year having graduated from Oxford, so I look forward to much interesting news, also have Dutch friend who loves Kew and we talk often and he sends me photos of Kew, it is vastly different from when I was last there. A wonderful place doing a marvllous work.


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