Conservation and climate change news

Plants have an essential role to play in mitigating the effects of climate change, because they take carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Conversely, if forests are destroyed by burning, then carbon dioxide is added to the atmosphere. Deforestation accounts for about one fifth of the world’s carbon emissions.

However, plants are threatened by environmental changes including climate change. Conserving plants is therefore critical to any sustainable solution to environmental change.

Kew's work in this area | Adopt a seed for £25 and help Kew protect plant life

Kew's Millennium Seed Bank

Kew's Millennium Seed Bank joins campaign to protect global food supplies

10 Dec 2010

A new partnership involving Kew and led by The Global Crop Diversity Trust announced a major global search to find, gather, catalogue, use, and save the wild relatives of essential food crops, to help protect global food supplies against the imminent threat of climate change, and strengthen future food security.


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The 'Firm of the Future' is a business inspired by nature.

by: Polly Williamson, Business Inspired by Nature blog
12 Nov 2010

This next decade will be about winding down the unsustainable business models of the 20th Century and evolving new 21st Century business models that are fit for purpose.

Added protection for the seas around the Chagos archipelago

by: Colin Clubbe, UK Overseas Territories team blog
04 Nov 2010

Colin Clubbe from Kew's UK Overseas Territories team reports on the latest news about the newly created Chagos Marine Reserve.

Origanum vulgare with hoverfly

Kew welcomes Nagoya biodiversity agreement

01 Nov 2010

Kew's Director, Professor Stephen Hopper talks about Kew's response to the agreement reached in Nagoya last week to protect the natural environment. A positive outcome for conserving the world's biodiversity.


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Preparing for an expedition to Ethiopia

by: Tim Harris, Herbarium blog
29 Oct 2010

Find out about Tim's preparations for an imminent trip to Ethiopia. The team will work with Kew's partners and research the country's rarest plants.

Dried specimen of Caliphruria tenera

Nature’s backbone at risk

26 Oct 2010

The most comprehensive assessment of the world’s vertebrates confirms an extinction crisis with one-fifth of species threatened. A recent study by Kew and partners has further revealed that that one fifth of plant species are also at risk - including Caliphruria tenera. However, the situation would be worse were it not for current global conservation efforts, according to a study launched today at the 10th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, in Nagoya, Japan.


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Hurrango Forest in Peru

How is Kew helping to conserve biodiversity?

18 Oct 2010

As international politicians and government representatives discuss the conservation and management of the world’s biodiversity at the Convention on Biological Diversity in Nagoya, Japan this week, Kew reflects on its work with partners around the world to support biodiversity.


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PLants at risk logo

New study shows one fifth of the world’s plants are under threat of extinction

29 Sep 2010

A global analysis of extinction risk for the world's plants, conducted by Kew together with the Natural History Museum, London and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), has revealed that the world’s plants are as threatened as mammals, with one in five of the world’s plant species threatened with extinction.


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Detail of a spider orchid (Ophrys sphegodes).

Ecologists find new clues on climate change in 150 year-old pressed plants.

22 Sep 2010

Plants picked up to 150 years ago by Victorian collectors and held by the million in herbarium collections across the world could become a powerful – and much needed – new source of data for studying climate change, according to research published this week in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Ecology.


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Cypripedium calceolus (Lady's slipper orchid)

The Plant List - the first working list of all known plants

20 Sep 2010

Kew and Missouri Botanical Gardens in the United States are collaborating with partners worldwide to create the first working list of all known plants.


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Rhodanthe manglesii

Rhodanthe manglesii
Mangles' everlasting

Mangles' everlasting is an attractive ornamental, native to south-western Australia and introduced to Europe by Captain James Mangles.

Find out more about this species

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