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Euphorbiaceae: Pseudanthus nematophorus

Pseudanthus nematophorus F.Muell.

Species

Pseudanthus nematophorus F.Muell.

Original Distribution

Australia, Western Australia

Habitat

The only habitat information we have is those accompanying the Oldfield specimen, which said that the plant was growing in “rocky and sandy locations”

Extinction Data

IUCN = Extinct Listed (Propably) 1989, FloraBase = Rare, Listed Extinct by WCMC 1996

Description

Erect, slender, hairless shrub, 30-60 cm tall. Linear leaves 1.2 cm long, are either in opposite pairs or arranged alternately. Very small stalkless flowers are clustered in the upper leaf axils or at the ends of branches. There are 3-7 male flowers in a cluster, with 1 female flower at the center or sometimes none. The male flower has 3 broadly ovate outer floral segments about 1 mm long and 2 smaller inner segments. The third inner segment is reduced to a red filament, 4-6 mm long. The 15-20 stamens are a little longer than the perianth, with short thick filaments and a rudimentary 2-3 lobed ovary in the center. The female flower usually has 4 narrow acute floral segments and an ovary with 2 lobes. The fruit is an oblong capsule, about 4 mm long with 4 valves. There have been 2 collections of this species, one made by James Drummond from the Moore-Murchison Rivers in 1859 and another by Augustus Oldfield from the Murchison River before 1861.

Number of Specimens at Kew

3

Specimen Type (Y/N)

N

Kew Herbcat Barcode Number

K000518023

Other Information

The name refers to the threat-like third segment of the inner floral whorl in the male flower. Cause: The most likely cause for extinction is habitat clearing for agriculture in combination with domestic grazing. There have been 2 collections of this species, one made by James Drummond from the Moore-Murchison Rivers in 1859 and another by Augustus Oldfield from the Murchison River before 1861. Synonym - Stachystemon nematophorus. FloraBase, Rare = Taxa which have been adequately searched for, and are deemed to be in the wild either rare, in danger of extinction, or otherwise in need of special protection, and have been gazetted as such, following approval by the Minister for the Environment, after recommendation by the State’s Endangered Flora

Information Sources

See also Bentham 1873. Briggs, J.D. & Leigh, J.H. (1988) Rare or threatened Australian Plants. Australin National Parks and Wildlife Service. Briggs, J.D. & Leigh, J.H. (1996) Rare or threatened Australian Plants. CSIRO publishing, Melbourne. Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C. & Marchant, N. (1998). Western Australian Threatened Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Como, Western Australia. Leigh, J.H., Briggs, J. & Hartley, W. (1981) Rare or threatened Australian Plants. Australian plants National Parks and Wildlife Service. Special publication nr 7. pp 40 Leigh, J., Boden, R. & J. Briggs (1984) Extinct and Endangered Plants of Australia. Macmillan, Melbourne. Pp 198-199. Leigh, J.H. & Briggs, J.D. (1992). Threatened Australian Plants, Overview and Case Studies. Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service, Canberra. Walter, K.S. and Gillett, H.J. (eds) (1998). 1997 IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants. Compiled by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre IUCN – The World Conservation Union, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK, Extinct Plant Species of the World IUCN Survey and preliminary report: April 1989