Skip to main content

You are here

Facebook icon
Pinterest icon
Twitter icon

UN Meeting on Biodiversity says action in support of biodiversity is urgently needed

As the UN Meeting on Biodiversity opens in Hyderabad, India, Kew joins representatives from over 170 countries to discuss a plan of action for protecting the planet’s biodiversity.

NYM_Nym_the_20100318AM087 (Main).jpg

A rare species of African waterlily, the 'thermal' lily (Nymphaea thermarum), was brought back from the brink of extinction at Kew

A course to halt biodiversity loss is set

The eleventh meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP 11) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), known as COP 11 for short, follows on the historic outcomes of the 2010 Nagoya biodiversity summit.

The charred remains of a forest which has been burned to make space for agriculture, Mexico

Forest burned for agriculture in southern Mexico

In Nagoya, governments adopted a new Strategic Plan for Biodiversity and two new supplementary protocols to the CBD, setting the course for halting biodiversity loss by the end of the current decade.

Mr. Ryu Matsumoto, the former Minister of the Environment of Japan, who served as COP 10 President in Nagoya, said at the opening: "While the COP10 outcomes are remarkable achievements, there will be no change unless they are implemented. At COP11, I trust that we can agree on further measures to overcome challenges that require additional efforts."

A time for action

At the meeting, the Government of India assumed the Presidency of COP 11. During their term, which runs from 2012 until 2014, the government of India will preside over the implementation of the work of the Convention, including the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity and its Aichi Biodiversity Targets.

While the COP 10 outcomes are remarkable achievements, there will be no change unless they are implemented. At COP 11, I trust that we can agree on further measures to overcome challenges that require additional efforts.

Mr. Ryu Matsumoto, the former Minister of the Environment of Japan

Ms Jayanthi Natarajan, Minister of Environment and Forests, Government of India and COP 11 President, said that: “The present global economic crisis should not deter us, but on the contrary encourage us to invest more towards amelioration of the natural capital for ensuring uninterrupted ecosystem services, on which all life on Earth depends.

Let us all be inspired by what Mahatma Gandhi said: ‘The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems’. So let us commit ourselves to what we are capable of doing.”

In his opening remarks, Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, the Executive Secretary to the Convention on Biological Diversity said: “I urge you, in Hyderabad, to mobilise the financial resources needed to enable developing countries to achieve the Aichi Targets at national level. In so doing, we will need to be creative and involve all partners.” procurement, reviewing and adjusting of economic instruments, and further engaging the business sector,” adding, “We will be judged by our acts, not our words.”

The meeting is mandated to consider, among others, the mobilisation of resources in support of the Global Strategy for Biodiversity and its Aichi Targets, a report on the identification of ecologically and biologically significant areas in marine ecosystems as well as a number of other items related to the protection of biodiversity in marine ecosystems; ecosystem restoration and the relationship between biodiversity and climate change.

How Kew is making a difference

Kew’s scientific research, collections, and international partnerships mean we have much to contribute in dealing with the environmental challenges of our times, including widespread biodiversity loss.

Use Kew's interactive map to explore the state of the world's plant life and find out more about plants at risk

In the run up to COP 2010, we conducted a global analysis of extinction risk for the world's plants, together with the Natural History Museum, London and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The study, entitled IUCN Sampled Red List Index for Plants, is a major baseline for plant conservation, and it was the first time the true extent of the threat to the world’s estimated 380,000 plant species was known.

From the results of the IUCN Sampled Red List Index for Plants, it was possible to say which plants are more threatened, where and why. Our analysis also revealed that the world’s plants are as threatened as mammals, with one in five plant species threatened with extinction.

Explore the state of plant life around the world

You can use Kew's interactive map and charts to find out more about the state of plant life around the world and compare the level of threat facing different plant groups and habitats.

The UN Meeting on Biodiversity continues until 19 October 2012.

Get involved - Adopt a Seed, Save a Species

We have successfully banked 10% of the world's wild plant species and we have set our sights on saving 25% by 2020.

Without plants there could be no life on earth, and yet every day another four plant species face extinction. Too often when we hear these kind of statistics there is little that we can do as individuals, but thanks to the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership and the Adopt a Seed, Save a Species campaign there is something that you can do to ensure the survival of a plant species.

Adopt a seed for just £25 | Save a plant species outright

Add comment

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
19 + 1 =
Solve this simple math problem and enter the result. E.g. for 1+3, enter 4.

Comments

16 October 2012
Hi there, The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew does not have a statutory function to advise Government on development issues. However, we are actively involved in species conservation of the UK flora. You can learn more about this initiative here: http://www.kew.org/news/uk-seed-hub.htm Thanks, Kew Feedback Team
14 October 2012
Are Kew advising our government to tell "developers" to stop destroying our own habitats in this country? The wildlife in england is being destroyed, illegally, due to the policy of "building will get us out of the recession." Someone should tell the government that that was the cause of the recession.