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Live online chat with Kew experts on how to grow orchids

Ask our orchid specialists any questions you have about how to grow orchids.

Photo of pink phalanopsis from a previous orchid festival
Phalaenopsis orchids from Kew's Orchid festival

Event details

  • Date: 20 February 2014
  • Time: 1-2pm
  • Location: online

About the event

As part of Kew's Orchids festival, we are offering orchid enthusiasts an hour-long opportunity to put questions about growing orchids to Kew’s expert horticulturists.

Join us for a live chat with our Kew specialists - Lara Jewitt, Science Collections Coordinator, and Christopher Ryan, Nursery and Orchid Collection Manager. They will both be online to answer your questions for 60 minutes.

So whether you are already a keen orchid grower or you’re just starting from scratch, we’d love to hear from you.

1. You can submit a question in advance by 1pm on 19 February, either:

2. Or you can submit a question on the day

  • Visit this page from 1pm on 20 February and you will be able to post a live question using the comments function at the bottom of this page. Just click 'Add a comment', enter a username and an email address (don’t worry - your address will not appear publicly) and write your question in the Comment field. As soon as our specialists have a response, we'll publish the question and answer together at the bottom of this page.

How to join the live chat

  • Just come back to this page at 1pm on 20 February – it’s as simple as that.
  • There is no login. The live chat will be open to all. Just remember to refresh your page regularly (by clicking F5) to see the latest questions and answers as they are posted.
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Comments

20 February 2014
How long can I leave a moth orchid unattended, for example when going away on holiday and are there any tricks for keeping them going - (I tried leaving my pots on damp newspaper when I was away for a fortnight with poor results)
20 February 2014
ANSWER TO CHRIS: Hello Chris, as we are running out of time the King Orchid should also be treated like the Cymbidium that was mentioned in Clives answer, i.e. differences in night and day time temperature will help it to produce flower spikes.
20 February 2014
Hi last year I was given a king orchid. It was almost finished flowering when u got it and have had a problem trying to get to look the part. Changed soil and bark as was advised by Alton's garden centre but nothing really has done it any favors. I was given a bit of advice by a elderly man when I was in the doctors he said them orchids are better left outside over winter to the eliments it will give it a new lease of live. So now it's looking better than the day I received it very healthy roots, dark green leaves and solid bulbs. Very very happy but would just like to know when to come in to flower and should I leave it outside or being it in. Thank you for your time Chris
20 February 2014
ANSWER TO GEORGINA: I presume this is a type of moth orchid, if it is it definitley will not like being watered with ice cubes as it will chill the roots of this tropical flower. Orchid are sensitive to water quality and they generally would prefer being watered with treated water, rain water or boiled water that has cooled down.
20 February 2014
Ive bought a plant called an Ice Orchid which Ive been told to water with ice cubes three times a week but its starting to look unhealthy “ any advice?
Abuse Reported. Comment will be reviewed and removed if necessary.
20 February 2014
ANSWER TO CLIVE: One of the main triggers for reflowering a Cymbidium is to make sure that the plant receives a distinct difference in day time and night time temperatures in the autumn. If you place your plant outside in a sheltered spot during the summer you should bring the plant inside again only after it has experienced a week or so of night time temperatures that are 10 degrees or so lower than day time temperatures, but dont leave it out to get frosted repeatedly.
20 February 2014
I have a Cymbidium orchid that hasn't flowered for a few years but keeps putting out new leaaves. How do I get it to flower?
20 February 2014
ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times. ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Thanks Kathryn. Teeny tiny white bugs in the bark sounds like mealybug, especially if they look furry. If there are lots of them I would repot the orchid into fresh compost to remove them. Also check the plant carefully as you may find them on the underside or between the leaves. If you do use some methylated spirit and a small paint brush to remove them and then rinse the plant with water. Keep an eye on the plant as you may need to do this several times.
20 February 2014
Happy Birthday Lara........I took a moth orchid out of its pot , and saw teeny tiny white bugs in the bark...are these harmful to the orchid, will they spread to others?
20 February 2014
ANSWER TO JUDE: Hi Jude it doesn't sound very promising, it sort of depends how many have fallen off and if you have any left. Generally if they have gone soft and brown it because it's been too cold and wet, if they go yellow then brown this generally indicates its been too bright and dry. Leaves falling off is not a good sign, if its a moth usually one leaf should fall off as another is produced.
Abuse Reported. Comment will be reviewed and removed if necessary.
20 February 2014
The leaves on my orchid keep turning brown and dropping off “ is it dying?
Abuse Reported. Comment will be reviewed and removed if necessary.
20 February 2014
Dont forget to refresh your webpage regularly (just hit F5) to see the lastest posts as they are published. To see all comments expand the See more comments link at the bottom of the page.
20 February 2014
ANSWER TO ALEXANDER: Hi Alexander, thanks very much for the birthday wishes. The basics for Phalaenopsis care are; that it is standing somewhere that has reasonably consistent temperatures and not in a draught, it also wants good indirect sunlight, an east or west facing window is often best. When watering the plant its important that it does not stay wet and soggy, let it dry out between watering. If there is not much compost it will dry out quicker than if it has lots of old decomposed compost, if this is the case you should repot the orchid with fresh orchid compost.
20 February 2014
A couple of years ago, I got a supermarket-Phalaenopsis for my birthday. It is an amazing plant. Over the years, most of the bark has been spilled out, it rarely gets any water at all, but the thing just keeps on living. So perhaps this gentle plant deserves some gentle attention. Could you please ouline the basics of Phalaenopsis care? And a happy birthday to you, Lara :-)
20 February 2014
ANSWER TO KATHRYN: Hello Kathryn, gone over orchids can be encouraged to reflower. For the common moth orchids, after the last flower has faded the flower spike can be cut back to a node, i.e. one of the rings, on the flower spike, this can lead to a smaller bonus flower spike emerging. For all other orchids the gone over flower spike will not produce new flowers, for these you will need to continue growing the plant until a new growth is formed and it is from this that a new flower spike will form. Depending on the type of orchid this may take between 6-12 months.
20 February 2014
hello....First thanks for this live chat. Now I am sure that lots of people will ask this, but is it worth trying to get 'gone over' orchids to flower again, or should we treat them like cut flowers? And if so......how do we get them to flower
20 February 2014
ANSWER TO POLKADOTSOPH: Most orchids like consistent temperatures, the thing with central heating is it provides a dry atmosphere, especially on windowsills above radiators, which is what the orchids dont like. Raising humidity by standing the plant on a tray of damp gravel will help, misting the leaves of plants will also help.
20 February 2014
Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house? Do orchids like central heating or do they prefer to be in a cool place in a house?
20 February 2014
ANSWER TO LAURENCE: Assuming that you have a healthy plant there are a couple of things that can initiate flowering these are temperature and fertiliser. Use an Orchid fertiliser that is specific for flowering, less nitrogen more potassium. Moving the plant to a room a couple of degrees cooler where it still gets good light can also bring on flowering.
20 February 2014
: Ive had an orchid plant for a year and it has never flowered in that time “ whats wrong with it?
20 February 2014
Dont forget to refresh your webpage regularly (just hit F5) to see the lastest posts as they are published.
20 February 2014
CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear. CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO BETH: This is something that commonly happens with orchids, especially Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) as the roots grow towards light. If the roots are still quite short then it is possible to repot and tuck the roots inside the pot. However in most cases the roots are quite long and brittle and if they are tucked into the pot, tend to break which can be detrimental to the plant. When we repot orchids we usually keep roots that have been growing outside the pot, outside and only place the roots that have been in the pot, back into the pot. However if the roots are dried and shrivelled or soft and rotten then these can be cut and removed from the plant. Orchids do like to be misted especially if they are somewhere warm and dry. When misting orchids it is important that water does not stay sitting on the new growth or centre of the plant as this can lead to rotting of the new growth and leaves as they appear.
Abuse Reported. Comment will be reviewed and removed if necessary.
20 February 2014
Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!) Please could you advise me on how best to handle orchids roots! They emerge out of their pot in a tangled web...Is it time for re-potting or should the dried out, flattened roots be pruned? 2. Should orchids be regularly misted? Thank you. Beth Butler (orchid addict!)
20 February 2014
LARA JEWITT AND CHRISTOPHER RYAN ANSWER TO @BOTANISER: For scale removal we recommend physically removing the scale insect with methylated spirit and a small paintbrush but this will need to be done regularly to remove any new outbreaks. Once done rinse the plant with water. After a couple of weeks you should hopefully see a reduction in scale. As for the vine weevil this is quite unusual if they are affecting your Orchids inside. The larvae are difficult to control other than repotting and going through the compost. Its likely that the vine weevil is coming from outside, I would suggest drenching your pots outside with a nematode application, which is available from online supplies for the treatment of vine weevil. You could also trap the adults and destroy them, to do this place an upturned terracotta filled with straw or shredded paper, leaving a small gap under the rim so the adults can crawl under it. Check each morning and dispose of any adults.
20 February 2014
QUESTION FROM @BOTANISER (via twitter): Persistent scale insects on my Phalanopsis orchids. What's the best way to clear? Also vine weevils sometimes.
20 February 2014
Hi everyone, thanks for joining me on my birthday.
20 February 2014
Good afternoon and thanks and for joining our live chat on everything you ever wanted to know about orchids. Our experts Lara Jewitt, Science Collections Coordinator and Christopher Ryan, Nursery and Orchid Collection Manager are here for the next hour to answer your burning questions! To submit your question just click the Add a comment button above. Your question will go in to a queue for moderation but well try to get around to answering as many queries as possible. You can also follow this chat live on Twitter - just follow using @kewgardens #KewOrchidsChat.